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 PÜLSÅR SRH7Ø9Ø   The Delirious Rock   Rocktastic Revolution   Robert F. Williams 
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 Fat Funky Person   The Echoing Green   Hair Pie Resistance 
(Funkadelic, Kraftwerk, The Red Krayola,
Robert Wyatt & Claude Eatherly)
 Fat Funky Person 


On August 6th, 1945, the US Air Force dropped the first atomic bomb over the town of Hiroshima, killing 140,000 citizens, followed by a second, three days later, over Nagasaki, killing another 70,000 men, women, and children.



Both bombs, nicknamed 'Little Boy' and 'Fat Man', had been developed secretly in the 'Manhattan Project'. Although by August 1945 no military need existed to use these weapons of mass destruction, the White House and Pentagon decided to use them anyway in what is generally believed to be a calculated and ruthless display of power that rather marks the beginning of the Cold War than the end of World War II.



While President Truman coined the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki "the greatest achievement of organized science in history", protests against the bombings and the further development of nuclear arms arose, notably in Europe, and gained considerably in strength after the publication of John Hersey's moving eyewitness accounts of the bombing of Hiroshima in The New Yorker in August 1946.
By the end of the 1950s the anti-nuclear movement had grown into a powerful political factor in Britain with groups like the DAC (Direct Action Committee Against Nuclear Weapons) and the CND (Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament), which organised the first of their annual protest marches from London to the nuclear weapons facility at Aldermaston in 1958. During the 1958 march the CND logo, designed by Gerald Holtom, first appeared in public. Outside Britain, and especially in the USA, the logo was soon to be adopted by the peace movement and was to become one of the icons of the counterculture. In his book Bomb Culture (1968) British artist and acitvist Jeff Nuttall describes how the British anti-nuclear movement fused with other countercultural currents and how much the art and thought of the Western post-war generation was dominated by the possible nuclear annihilation of mankind.
One of the pilots who had taken part in the bombing of Hiroshima, Major Claude Eatherly, was embraced by the anti-nuclear movement after reports had reached Europe that Eatherly suffered from guilt and had been confined to a military mental hospital in Waco, Texas. One of the founders of the anti-nuclear movement and prominent critics of Western technocracies, German philosopher Günther Anders, started a correspondence with Eatherly, which was published as Burning Conscience, The Guilt of Hiroshima in 1961.

Bertrand Russell introduced the correspondence. The more attention Eatherly's case and pacifism got, the more the ex-pilot became an embarrassment to the US military, and several efforts were undertaken to discredit Eatherly, cast doubt on the sincerity of his feelings of guilt, and isolate him in a closed ward of the mental hospital. On the soundtrack Fat Funky Person fragments of Eatherly's letters to Günther Anders are read against Robert Wyatt's Foreign Accents in the background.
From his days as drummer of the early Soft Machine to his latest album Robert Wyatt has remained loyal to his roots, which lie in the French avant-garde (pataphysics, surrealism, dadaism), jazz, blues, and socialism. Political themes and highly personal songs alternate on his albums. Wyatt doesn't distinguish between the two. Foreign Accents sums up names associated with nuclear warfare: Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Mordechai Vanunu, and the name of Mohammad Mossadegh, Prime Minister of Iran deposed in 1953 by American and British intelligence services in faour of the pro-Western Shah. The names are interspersed with the Japanese phrases ko n nichiwa (=hello) and arigato (=thank you).


Not very far from where Eatherly spent many years in a mental hospital, another kind of Texan madness grew in 1966 when Mayo Thompson formed the artists' band The Red Krayola. Their psychedelic and deconstructionist first album The Parable of Arable Land combined songs and 'free form freakouts' by a group of friends called The Familiar Ugly. One of those freakouts - the one between the songs Transparent Radiation and War Sucks - was isolated on the Fat Funky Person sound-track and combined with the cries "Bail out! Bail out!", with which Claude Eatherly allegedly awoke from his guilt-ridden nightmares.
The bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the wars in Korea and Vietnam, and the nuclear arms race between the US and USSR triggered large anti-nuclear and peace movements, which became pillars of the counterculture. Suspicion of scientific developments and critique of dehumanised Western technocracies underlay much of the countercultural field.



The German band Kraftwerk (formed by Florian Schneider and Ralph Hütter in 1971) subtly embodied both the fears and the desires of dehumanised societies. Their electronic 'robot pop' and 'man-machine' esthetics were brilliant ambiguous concepts that explore manifest and subconscious layers of technocratic societies. On the Fat Funky Person soundtrack Kraftwerk's Uranium from the album Radio-Activity (1975) has been included.
The soundtrack opens with a short fragment of Funkadelic's Wars of Armageddon (1971). Funkadelic was one of the two bands (the other being Parliament) masterminded by George Clinton in the sixties and seventies. Of the two bands (P.Funk for short) Funkadelic was the more psychedelic, riotous, rock- and guitar-oriented, with influences of Jimi Hendrix, The MC5 and Sly Stone. Political issues like the A-bomb, the Vietnam war and the position of Afro-Americans played an important part in P.Funk's lyrics and performances, as long as they were funky enough.
 Fat Funky Person 
(Funkadelic, Kraftwerk, The Red Krayola, Robert Wyatt & Claude Eatherly)
Goddamn,
Pollution is a fat, funky person.
So, constant decay in
Uranium creates the radioactive ray.
Durch stätigen Zerfall
Entstehen radioaktive Strahlen aus dem Urankristall.
Bail out! Bail out!
My request for a leave or a trial visit
Was turned down.
My doctor tried to get me a leave,
But it was turned down in Washington.
So now you can see
How much I will be controlled.
I assure you they will never stop me
From writing what I believe and think,
Although they may keep me under detention.
My doctor told me
We would try again in a month or two.
He says the public is too much concerned over me
And that I am still getting too much publicity to release me now.
  Hiroshima Nagasaki
Nagasaki Hiroshima
Arigato Vanunu
Ko n nichiwa Mossadegh
Arigato Mordechai
Ko n nichiwa Mohammad
Hiroshima Nagasaki
Hiroshima Nagasaki
Ko n nichiwa arigato
Nagasaki Hiroshima
Nagasaki Hiroshima
Arigato Vanunu
Ko n nichiwa Mossadegh
Arigato Mordechai
Ko n nichiwa Mohammad
Hiroshima Nagasaki
Ko n nichiwa arigato
  Some fifteen years have passed,
And it has cost me much
Because of the mental and emotional disturbances,
Caused by the guilt of such crime.

I have spent nearly eight of those years in hospitals And a short time in jails.

I always seemed to be happier in jails
Because I had a release of guilt by being punished...
* Funkadelic - Maggot Brain, Westbound Records Inc., WBCD2007
* Kraftwerk - Radio-Activity, Capitol Records Inc., LC0148
* The Red Krayola with The Familiar Ugly - The Parable of Arable Land, Collectables Records,
  COL-CD-0551
* Robert Wyatt - Cuckooland, Rykodisc, HNCD1468
* Günther Anders & Claude Eatherly - Burning Conscience; The Guilt of Hiroshima, Second American
  Edition, Paragon House, 1989 (Originally published as Off Limits für das Gewissen, Rowohlt
  Verlag, 1961)
 Missed Encounters   Analysis Groove   Degeneration   Heliocentric Committee 
 PÜLSÅR SRH7Ø9Ø   The Delirious Rock   Rocktastic Revolution   Robert F. Williams 
 Lucifer Sam Division   Trade Union   Bloc concret 
 Fat Funky Person   The Echoing Green   Hair Pie Resistance